After his death in 54 AD (at age of 63), his grand-nephew and adopted son Nero succeeded him as Emperor.

Claudius' infirmity probably saved him from the fate of many other nobles during the purges of Tiberius's and Caligula's reigns; potential enemies did not see him as a serious threat.

His survival led to his being declared Emperor by the Praetorian Guard after Caligula's assassination, at which point he was the last man of his family.

During his reign the Empire began the conquest of Britain (if the earlier invasions of Britain by Caesar and Caligula's aborted attempts are not counted).

Having a personal interest in law, he presided at public trials, and issued up to twenty edicts a day.

to keep him disciplined, under the logic that his condition was due to laziness and a lack of will-power.

However, by the time he reached his teenage years his symptoms apparently waned and his family took some notice of his scholarly interests.

In 7 AD, Livy was hired to tutor him in history, with the assistance of Sulpicius Flavus.

He spent a lot of his time with the latter and the philosopher Athenodorus.

These events damaged his reputation among the ancient writers, though more recent historians have revised this opinion.

Many authors contend that he was murdered by his own wife.

There is some speculation that the inscription was added by Claudius himself decades later, and that he originally did not appear at all.